UP Library Web WWW            

Department of Library Services
Library Home About the Library Libraries / Units / Collections E-Resources Journals Catalogue Contact
   
 
Special Collections
Home
News
About Us
Contact Us
Collections
UP Publications Bibliography
Useful Links
Book of the month
Service Hours
Policies
Request ISB number
How to access electronic yearbooks
Special Collections Brochure
 
 
   Cyril Ramaphosa / by Anthony Butler
 
Comments  |   Catalogue link
 


 
 
 

 

Cyril Ramaphosa is one of South Africa's  is one of South Africa's most celebrated political leaders. He first came to prominence in the 1980's as general secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers and as a major force in the domestic struggle for political freedom. When Nelson Mandela was released from prison in February 1990, Ramaphosa was at the head of the reception committee that greeted him.  As secretary-general of the ANC after its unbanning, he re-established the liberation movement as a mass political party.  He is widely credited with playing a major role in the negotiations that led to the democratic settlement in South Africa, and in devising the country's new and internationally renowned constitution. Soon after this triumph, Ramaphosa left politics and became a successful businessman.

This commanding biography by Anthon Butler tells the story of Cyril Ramaphosa's life for the first time.  It is based on rich interviews with many of the subject's friends and contemporaries, and it situates Ramaphosa's achievements and his shortcomings in the context of the often tumultuous historical events that surrounded him.  Here is a frank appraisal of the achievements and limitations of one of South Africa's most enigmatic political figures.

 

 

Cyril Ramaphosa in Stockholm Sweden, on a fundraising visit for NUM, October 1983.

Cyril Ramaphosa and his wife Tshepo Motsepe, at the Sowetan awards ceremony, June 2002.
Source : Cyril Ramaphosa © 2007 / Anthony Butler.
Search
Quick Links
My Library Space
 
Print Page     |    Copyright © University of Pretoria 2008. All rights reserved